Grand Giraffe07/23/2015

Climbing in Eldorado Canyon offers one the unique opportunity to retread the same hallowed cracks and fissures in the cliffs that pioneering giants of the activity did over 50 years ago. Eldo is one of a handful of places where the cutting edge of the sport was inexorably advanced during its infancy in North America; if you educate yourself and you pay attention, scaling these same routes affords a sense of connection to a larger tradition and community that I think is a bit less tangible in many other arenas. I feel fortunate for those opportunities; Grand Giraffe is definitely one of those routes…

Some Recent Thoughts Only Ever-So-Tangentially Related to the Hardrock 10007/16/2015

Last weekend I drove down to Silverton to spectate at the Hardrock 100. This was my sixth year at the event, but the first time that I wasn’t on some kind of crewing or pacing duty…

The Yellow Spur06/23/2015

The Yellow Spur in Eldorado Canyon is one of the most iconic climbs in the state. It’s a beautiful, logical line of seven pitches up the biggest wall in the canyon (Redgarden), and finishes on the undeniably aesthetic knife-blade summit of Tower One. Climbing in Eldo doesn’t get much better…

Dipping a Toe: Biking to COS and Back06/22/2015

The plan was to bike down on Friday (June 12th), visit with my family Saturday, and then bike back on Sunday. The massive convenience of having my sister’s home as a destination meant I could pack super-light, which also meant I could ride my speed machine, carbon, road rig, too—a huge bonus…

RTW Ruminations: June 1 – 706/10/2015

6/1/2015
Mon – Biking: Lefthand Cyn to Brainard to SSV to Lyons to NSV (5:54, 9200′, 101mi)
A couple of days ago I re-read Robert Pirsig’s Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. I read it the first time over 15 years ago—I think I was in the 8th or 9th grade—and, predictably, didn’t appreciate it very much. When I was back home in Nebraska over Memorial Day Weekend, my dad referenced it, which prompted the totally worthwhile re-read. It’s a book that I’ve always viewed the reading of as almost painfully cliche, but I think now that that just denotes its truly classic status…